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Chris Beaumont

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Chris Beaumont

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Shaun Walsh

Henbury Court

Lawrence Hawker

Henleaze

Ferdo Dizdarevic

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Chris Beaumont

Stoke Park

Paul Girdlestone

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Chris Beaumont

St Michaels

Chris Beaumont

St Peter's C of E

Paul Girdlestone

Summerhill Primary

Kajan Ramakrishnalal

Victoria Park Primary

Kajetan Wandowicz

Westbury on Trym

Kajetan Wandowicz

Westbury Park

Laurence Hawker

Wrington

Chris Strong

Save the Children - FAST Programme schools

 

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Robert Chandler

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Robert Chandler

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Robert Chandler

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Robert Chandler

 

 

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Previous Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Avon Primary

Connought Primary

Easton C of E Primary

Horfield CofE 

Ilminster Ave - Knowle

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Supported by:

 

   
       
 

 

CSC Bristol Championships 2016 by Kajetan Wandowicz

21 June 2016 | Henleaze Junior School

 

Participants: 108 children (75 boys and 33 girls)

 

Bristol had seen three days of chess weather on the run-up to the tournament. Daily lashings of torrential rain meant most school sports events were cancelled. But it is, of course, a fact universally acknowledged that chess playing children are the bravest of all sportsmen: they will play come rain, hail or snow. In fact, several players were playing with broken wrists or indeed legs in plaster, showing blatant disregard for their health, comfort and safety to defend the honour of their schools. Pain means nothing when you wear the shield of your beloved school on your chest. And those supposedly tough footballers at the Euros sit out matches when they pull a muscle, those crybabies.

 

Respect is one of the most important values of Chess Behaviour

 

27 teams of four contested the Bristol Championship shield: seven Year 3 teams, thirteen Year 4 teams, five Year 5 teams and a couple of Year 6 teams. Some teams sported fearsome names like Cabot Crushers or Badock’s Wood Bulldogs in the hope of sending shivers of horror down prospective opponents’ spines even before the first move was played. Others chose innocuous or funky names, no doubt to put their opponents at ease and then capitalise at their false sense of security. I mean, how do you actually play against Westbury Park Flippy Fish or Wesbury-on-Trym Cookies? And some decided that medals were a foregone conclusion and confidently assumed bold monikers like Champions or Unbeatables.

 

Horfield Hawks v Emersons Green ET

 

The event ran smoothly but the games were nothing but smooth. Fierce attacking play met tenacious defence and even fiercer counter-attacks. No meagre pawn, no single square was conceded without a fight, everyone determined to bring glory to their school.

 

Master-level concentration

 

In the end Horfield Hawks prevailed. A great success considering they are only Year 4 and many older children played in teams they bested! They surely will get even stronger at chess in the future, and meanwhile they take the Bristol Champions shield back to Horfield Primary. Each also received a medal and a magical pocket chess set which keeps the position even if you have to stop and close it in the middle of a game.

 

2016 Bristol Champions: Horfield Hawks

 

In fact, it was a day of the young. Mirroring the professional game which gets younger and younger by the year (consider that the current World Champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway became a Grandmaster at the ridiculously tender age of 13), there were no Year Fives or Sixes on the podium this year. Silver and bronze went to St Bonaventure’s Red Masters (a Year 4 team) and Henleaze Unbeatables (Year Threes!) respectively. The two teams were actually equal on points and only the tie-break score decided who got the Runners-up shield.

 

2016 Bristol Vice-Champions St Bonaventure’s Red Masters

 

Bronze medallists: Henleaze Unbeatables

 

In addition to the team prizes, top scorers on each board got sets of chess books so they could become even more formidable opponents to anyone who would dare challenge them to a game. Such challenges probably will not be plentiful, considering that perfect score (five wins in as many games) was needed for this prize. On the second board actually two players managed to vanquish all opposition and they were declared joint board winners. He who challenges these five does so at his peril.

 

Individual medal winners

 

Finally, seeing how the podium was all but swept clean by Year Fours, prizes for best teams in particular year groups were also awarded. As two Year 4 teams were best and second-best overall, they did not qualify for this prize (and nor did the overall-third Year Threes qualify for the one in their age group). These went to:

 

Cabot Crushers crushed almost all opposition to win the Year 6 prize

 

Victoria Park Checkmaters lived up to their name to secure the Year 5 medals

 

Compass Point Champions indeed played like champions and got the Year 4 prize for their efforts

 

Best Year 3 team: Henleaze Check Us Out (see what they did there with the name?

 

And just so nobody would go home empty-handed, every player got a nice certificate in recognition of not only their high-level chess but also great sportsmanship and adherence to proper chess etiquette:

 

All participants with an accidental adult who did not manage to leave the photo frame in time

 

And lest anyone doubt the players’ enthusiasm, they will be well advised to watch the following video where everyone gives chess a resounding “Yes!” Incidentally, Yes2Chess is the name of our secure online chess-playing platform for children which works on all school laptops, home computers, and even tablets, and which your pupils can use to play chess completely anonymously and safely against children from other schools in the UK and other countries (ask your chess tutor for more information).

 
 

We at Chess in Schools and Communities would like to wholeheartedly congratulate all players on their performance. We are ever so grateful to Henleaze Junior School for hosting the event and helping us run it smoothly. Our special thanks go to Deputy Headteacher Jonathan Parr for his generosity with his time and going the extra mile to accommodate us.

 

See you next year!

 

Final Tournament Standings

 

Pos

Score

Team Name

Year

Match pts

Tie-Break

 

1

15.5

Horfield Hawks

4

9.00

56.50

2

13.5

St Bonaventure’s Red Masters

4

7.00

54.00

3

13.5

Henleaze Unbeatables

3

7.00

52.50

4

12.5

Henleaze Check Us Out

3

8.00

55.50

5

12.5

Cabot Crushers

6

6.00

63.00

6

12.0

Compass Point Champions

4

6.00

56.50

7

12.0

St Bonaventure’s Checking Chickens

4

5.00

52.00

8

11.5

Emersons Green ET

3

7.00

57.50

9

11.0

Victoria Park Checkmaters

5

7.00

46.00

10

11.0

Emersons Green Knights

3

6.00

48.00

11

10.5

Cabot Eliminators

6

6.00

54.50

12

10.5

St Michael’s Checkmates 1

4

5.00

49.00

13

10.0

Westbury-on-Trym Champion Chess

3

6.00

54.00

14

10.0

Glenfrome Neymar

5

5.00

49.50

15

10.0

Henleaze Super Hen

3

5.00

48.00

16

9.5

Ashton Vale Robins

4

5.00

56.50

17

9.5

Stoke Knights in Armour

4

5.00

45.50

18

9.5

Westbury Park Flippy Fish

5

5.00

43.50

19

9.5

Badocks Wood Bulldogs

4

4.00

48.50

20

9.5

Compass Point Checkmaters

4

3.00

36.00

21

9.0

Glenfrome JTSN

5

6.00

55.00

22

9.0

Horfield Wolves

4

5.00

38.50

23

9.0

Badocks Wood Chess Champions

4

4.00

46.50

24

8.5

Westbury Park Swack Blue Tack

5

2.00

49.50

25

8.0

Westbury-on-Trym Cookies

3

3.00

38.50

26

7.0

St Michael’s Checkmates 2

4

2.00

49.50

27

6.0

Stoke Park Chess Warriors

4

1.00

51.00

 

 

CSC Bristol Championships

 

It was already the fourth time that Henleaze Junior School hosted the CSC Bristol Championship tournament: and what a tournament it was again!

 

 

   

Spacious, well-lit playing hall with a stage for the top two matches could easily serve as the venue for one of the top professional chess tournaments in the world. Given that these are traditionally held in deep Siberia beyond the reach of planes, trains or Google Maps, I’m sure the pros would gladly swap.

 

For some it was their first chess tournament; for some, it was the first time they represented their school at anything at all. Unsurprisingly, levels of motivation were high, as everyone wanted to acquit themselves admirably and finish the day in winners’ glory. Rumours circulated of open-top buses waiting already for the bookies’ favourites to use in their triumphant procession back to their school, with whole neighbourhoods lining the streets in eager anticipation and hope to catch but a glimpse of the victors and their olive wreaths. (Whilst we are certain of their veracity, we have to concede that these rumours remain unconfirmed at this point in time.)

 

Chess is a cruel game sometimes, but it teaches children to take any setbacks as motivation to go forward. Several a premature celebratory gesture froze mid-air, to the horror of the celebrator, when they realised that what they supposed was checkmate inflicted on their opponent was in fact no such thing, as their foolhardy queen had ventured to attack the other king without any backing and was simply taken by the defending monarch: but such is chess! One one occasion, both players acknowledged checkmate, shook hands and summoned the arbiters to note the score, only to realise that checkmate in fact had not occurred. By the rules of both chess and life though, once you shake on it, there’s no taking it back, and the result had to stand. To huge credit of all players, any tears were swallowed before they even saw the light of day: with the head held up high a congratulatory hand was extended, gracious in defeat, and a tough lesson learnt.

 

For every defeat there’s a winner and someone had to come out on top. In the end it was Hillcrest A who fended off all challengers and narrowly edged out Oldfield Park A and Westbury-on-Trym B to the top spot, finishing on a very high 50 points out of 60 to Oldfield’s 49 and Westbury’s 48. It has to be mentioned that whilst Hillcrest A are all in year 5, both Oldfield Park A and Westbury-on-Trym B were composed entirely of year 3 pupils: yet another great illustration of how chess is a fair and equal game for everyone where height or muscles don’t matter, and children from all year groups, and indeed both sexes, can compete together.

 

As the overall winners of the whole competition were a year 5 team, the prize for top year 5 team went in fact to the second-placed year fives, Hillcrest B (what a showing from Hillcrest Primary!). Horfield CofE won top year 4 and Emersons Green A top year 3.

 

In addition to medals for all the placings mentioned above, fantastic books were given out to top board scorers. However, the most difficult challenge for the arbiters came with the Fair Play prize, where we were simply spoilt for choice but in the end decided to reward remarkable composure and dignity in defeat displayed by one of the participants. Having lost his game in the most unfortunate of manners, he could be forgiven for collapsing entirely and not putting up any fight any more. None other than the World Champion Magnus Carlsen lost his first-round tournament game recently by defaulting on time in a winning position (he had not familiarised himself with the tournament rules that stipulated the time limits), and went on to lose several more games in the same tournament, his level of play dropping round by round. What about our hero? Quite the contrary: he took his defeat with great resilience of spirit and fought even harder than before to make up for his loss. Magnus might want to hire him as a trainer for his next tournament.

 

There were refreshments for the players, well-deserved between rounds of fighting on the chessboard (as ruthless as it was courteous), and ample tea and coffee for the grown-ups, of which we averaged 72 cups per head. We call it the ‘supervisor cuppa factor’: if you’re able to have several cups of tea at a children’s tournament then apparently you’ve got little arbitrating to do, so well-behaved the children are. Well, the supervisor cuppa factor was very high that afternoon at Henleaze Junior: there simply were virtually no disputes, complaints or claims.

It will be hard to improve next year, but we will certainly be back to try!

 

- Kajetan Wandowicz

 

 

CSC end of year competition

 

 

   

Henleaze Primary School have agreed to host the CSC end of year competition, which will be held on Tues 7th July.

 

Quick outline:

 

  • teams of 4

  • max 2 teams per school

  • players must be in the CSC class(s)

  • arrive by 1pm for briefing, comp starts 1:20pm, finish by 4:30pm

  • 30min per round, which will include arbitrating unfinished games, setting the boards back up, new pairings. This should mean that the games will be about 20mins playing time.

 

  • 5 rounds:

 

  • Rd1 - 1:20

  • Rd2 - 2:00

  • Rd3 - 2:30

  • Rd4 - 3:00

  • Rd5 - 3:30

 

  • Prize giving - 4:10 Depart - 4:30

  • entry is free

 

Please let  know if you can help out. Those helping should arrive by 12:30.

 

Photos and reports will follow.

 

- Robert Chandler

 

 

Wrington CofE School outstanding candidates

 

 

   

12.5.15 - Iben Hullah is in Year 4. She has progressed superbly and played for the Somerset county side in the WECU games, EPSCA semi-final and EPSCA final. She also played in the Megafinal this weekend. Unfortunately they paired boys and girls together otherwise she would have definitely qualified as she lost in the final round to the county number 1.

 

Max Walker was in my class two years ago. He plays for the county U11 team on board 5. He is really amazing. Unfortunately the team did not make the national finals but he played in WECU and EPSCA semi-finals losing just one game.He was second in the megafinal in Millfield on Sunday.

 

He has (today) been selected for the SW England match against Wales on 31st May.

 

- Chris Strong

 

 

Chess match between Berkeley and Sharpness Primary Schools

 

 

   

15.5.15 - "For Berkeley and Sharpness, as for any schools in rural Gloucestershire, getting together is always a bit of a hassle. But they didn't need to for this chess meeting: they met at Chess in School's online playing platform Yes2Chess! There were many good fights and everyone enjoyed themselves, although it seemed that without an opponent to distract we might have forgotten our chess silence a bit".

 

Click here for photos

 

- Kajetan Wandowicz

 

 

Gigafinals qualification

 

15.5.15 - I am pleased to let you know that at least 18 out of 29 CSC pupils from Bristol & Bath who played megafinals qualified for next stage, gigafinals. I am also pleased with the number of girls who played exceptionally well.

 

These two schools were most successful.

 

HENLEAZE JUNIOR SCHOOL, BRISTOL

 

 

   

1 Chirag H U10B - Suprimo

2 Timmy Malcolm, U10B - Suprimo (6/6)

3 Abha K U9G - Suprima

4 Felix D U9B - Q

5 Harry Yeo U9B - Q

6 Sam House U9B - Q

7

8

 

 (Incomplete list)

 

OLDFIELD PARK JUNIOR SCHOOL, BATH

 

1 Fiona Thet, U9G - Suprima

2 Charlotte Lang, U8G - Suprima

3 Jach Frith, U10 - Q

4 Callum MacDonald C, U10 - Q

5 Dimitri Lang, U10 - Q

6 Alex Timbrell, U9B - Q

7 Rilay A-D, U8B - Q

8 Mathew Timbrell, U7B - Q

9 Samir Khan,* U9B - Suprimo (6/6)

* Samir who completed one year csc program is currently at Widcombe Junior school in Bath. He scored 6/6.

 

- Eva Delves- Broughton, U9G csc pupil from St Johns, - Q

 

- Ferdo Dizdarevic

 

 

Southern Megafinals at Millfield

 

15.5.15 - Between the 2 classes I teach in Hillcrest Primary 8 children qualified for the Southern Megafinals at Millfield.

All 8 attended with varying scores between 2 and 4½.

 

1 child. Elliot Raspail-Joyner qualified for the next stage Gigafinals.

 

- Peter Saunders

 

 

Nice feedback from children at Sharpness Primary

 

 


 

 

 


 

CSC Gloucestershire Tournament

27 June 2014, Stone-with-Woodford Primary School

 

 
   

The normally peaceful parking lot was rather busy that sunny morning, with 12 teams from 7 schools arriving to fight for the ultimate chess crown of the year: the 2014 Chess in Schools Gloucestershire Championships.

 

 
   

29 boys and 19 girls with determination firmly engraved on their faces, focused on all the pins, skewers, forks and back-rank checkmates learnt this year in CSC lessons. Kingswood Whizz Kids, an all-girl team from Kingswood Primary, were chatting with the other team from their school, the Wizards, motivating each other for the task to come.

 

The starting list looked very formidable, some teams sporting fearsome names like Kingslayers and Destroyers, and some with more to-the-point monikers like Checkmaters or Captures, making a statement about the treatment they intended to serve their opponents. Meanwhile, final preparations were being carried out inside. The host school did a superb job indeed: the playing area was well-lit and comfortable, there was a waiting room with refreshments and biscuits and possibility to go out to the playground. Class M very helpfully volunteered to help set up the 48 chessboards arranged into six 4-board match tables. Six rounds of fighting chess was awaiting, with 20 minutes per game.

 

 

1st Prize

After a short welcome and technical briefing, the competition begun. No sooner had the arbiter started the round than the adults waiting outside looked at each other with worried expressions: was everything all right? What was going on? Why could they not hear a single sound coming from a room full of effervescent Year 3's, 4's and 5's? The answer was, naturally, chess. A visiting headteacher remarked that he'd never seen his pupils quieter. We can be sure he won't, either: you can't beat absolute silence. Each of the 144 games of chess played over the next three hours was contested in perfect professional atmosphere from which Grandmasters could learn. There was not a single conflict or protest, on the contrary: some professional chess players could do with a class of chess behaviour run by the children! Each round started with 24 firm handshakes, 48 friendly smiles and an ubiquitous murmur of "Best of luck"s and "Have a good game"s. But let great sportsmanship and friendly atmosphere not deceive you: games were fought out to the end, with determined attacks, desperate counterattacks being found when everything was all but lost, elegant checkmates, few resignations and bare-king draws aplenty. Yet another lesson professional players could learn!

 

 
   

The championships were extremely close, with final podium standings only decided in the last round. That is, all places except the first: Coaley Captures dominated the tournament throughout, winning all their matches. They finished a full point above the second-placed Stone Class M, who benefited from having a very even team, as they finished on the same number of match points as Coaley Kingslayers and North Nibley Checkmaters, and only beat the latter two by virtue of winning more individual encounters throughout the entire tournament. No team finished on nil.

 

The last round finished at 1.20pm and after a short break the prizewinners were announced at the awards ceremony. The winners took home gold medals and a gold cup for their school, the runners-up got silver medals and a silver cup. We didn't have a bronze cup, but there were bronze medals! But team prizes weren't everything. Four very nice chess books were given out as well, for best individual performances in the boys' and girls' categories. Oswell from Hillesley Hawks did not leave others a chance and snatched the best individual performance prize with a cool six wins in that many games, with Max of Coaley Captures in close pursuit, but not quite there, having "only" managed to win five and draw one. Ruby from Stone Class M won the girls' prize, having only played (and beaten) one other girl but going 4-1 against boys; Emily of Coaley Kingslayers came second.

 

Those that thought it would be over then were in for a surprising treat: Mrs Kim McCalmont, headteacher of Stone Primary, held a random prize draw and gave out further 8 chess books sponsored by Chess in Schools! And then everyone got a certificate, congratulating them on making that Friday a memorable day of fantastic chess and great sportsmanship.

 

- Kajetan Wandowicz (CSC Tutor)

 


 

 

Posted: February 27, 2014

 

Children game for chess challenge

 

 
 
   

Free demonstration classes were held at Bath's central library (pictured left) over half term to encourage children to play chess.

 

Ferdo Dizdarevic, a Bath-based coach with the national charity Chess to Schools and Communities donated two chess sets to the library.

 

The charity is also teaching chess as part of the curriculum in four city primary schools.

 

Library manager Sheila Leedon was presented with the sets by Mr Dizdarevic.

 

Read more ...

 

 

 

 


 

Save the Children - Families and Schools Together (FAST)

 

FAST is an award-winning project, developed by Save The Children, that supports parents to improve their children's learning and development at home, so they can reach their full potential at school. In North Bristol this has been successfully delivered in the following schools: Upper Horfield Primary, Sea Mills Primary, Henbury Court Primary and this term a course is being delivered at Long Cross Primary.

 

 
 
   

Education is the key to breaking the vicious cycle that keeps people poor – generation after generation. Children from deprived areas are 50% less likely to get five GCSEs at A-C grades as children from better off areas. The FAST programme seeks to redress this achievement gap by building stronger relationships between parents, children, teachers and their communities so children have a better chance to fulfil their potential.

 

Teachers reported a 10% improvement in children's reading, writing and maths after completing the FAST programme. There was a 52% reduction in poor child behaviour at home, a 40% reduction of poor behaviour at school and 90% of parents said they had stronger relationships with their child.

 

Chess in Schools and Communities are proud to be part of the FAST project in Bristol from the beginning. In each of the 4 FAST schools CSC South West Coordinator Robert Chandler ran an 8 week chess course for the children during their activity time.

 

The FAST programme positively impacts at least 30 – 40 families in each school.

 

More information about the FAST project.

 


 

Primary Times

September 2013

 

 

 

 

  Download full article

 


 

A tough day back in school

 

The UK's number one player, GM Michael "Mickey" Adams, doesn't just play in many of the world's top tournaments, such as the London Chess Classic, he also writes a popular chess column every Saturday in the Weekend section of the Daily Telegraph. Mickey also supports worthy causes, such as schools supported by our very own Chess in Schools and Communities charity - and last Saturday, in his Daily Telegraph column, he wrote about a training weekend held at Westbury-on-Trym Academy, just before they set off for the National Schools Chess Championships.

 

Read more ...

 


 

Chess and Squirrels

 
 
   

Mickey Adams paid a visit to Westbury on Trym Church of England Academy in Bristol on 5 July.

 

In an effort to make some space at home, Mickey generously donated chess books from his large collection. He also gave a simultaneous display and signed autographs.

 

 
   

Mickey said -  Every year at the London Classic, the news of the number of new chess teachers, students and schools involved with the charity is announced and it was great to get more involved ..."

 

Read more ...

 

 

 


 

Chess on the rise in inner-city schools

 
 
   

02.5.13 - The game of chess might have a rather elite image but that could be about to change.

 

Nearly £700,000 has recently been set aside to introduce chess to city schoolchildren who would otherwise probably never experience it. Richard Payne has visited a school in Bristol where chess is a popular part of the curriculum.

 

Read more ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

MEP to visit Colston’s Primary School

15th June 2012

 

 

Lib Dem Member of the European Parliament Sir Graham Watson will visit Colston’s Primary School, Cotham this Friday to take part in a chess in schools initiative.

 

Graham will take on students in a game of chess in addition to discussing with teachers how they incorporate games into the curriculum. The visit follows the launch of chess Grandmaster Gary Kasparov’s foundation at the European Parliament earlier in the Spring to encourage more students to play chess in school.

 

The event is organised by Chess in Schools and Communities who organise chess tournaments and events in schools to promote the game.

 

Read full press release | Photo from the visit |

 

 

 


 

UK Chess Challenge Gloucestershire Megafinals - Bob Chandler

 

 
   

Urban Chess school Westbury on Trym Academy won 2 age groups with the U11 Girls (Danielle Ramiah) and U9 Boys (Laurence Chandler) Champions at the Gloucestershire Megafinals.

 

There were 14 children who took part with an amazing total of 8 qualifying for the Gigafinals in Derby! The Westbury on Trym players; Danielle Ramiah, Finn Wisloff, Jake Garrod, Robin Jones, Diarmuid Wisloff, Joseph Speers, Laurence Chandler, Thomas Melichar, Stephen Ramaih, JunMin Kwon, Luke Wolfram, Wilbur Hornby and Eskil Wisloff battled it out over 6 rounds coming up against the best chess players in the region. Well done!

 

 

 

© SC

 

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